BCG Webinars for 2017

The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to announce its webinar line-up for 2017. All webinars will be broadcast by Legacy Webinars, and held on the third Tuesday of the month at 8pm Eastern. The webinar schedule is as follows:

– 17 January – Michael Leclerc, CG, “Writing up your Research”
– 21 February – Karen Stanbary, CG, “Weaving DNA Test Results into a
Proof Argument”
– 21 March – Rebecca Koford, CG, “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same
Name”
– 18 April – Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, “The Genealogy in Government Documents”
– 16 May – Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL, “MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA
with the GPS”
– 20 June – Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, “Beating the Bushes: Using the
GPS to Find Jacob Bush’s Father”
– 18 July – Angela Packer McGhie, CG, “Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas
for Further Research”
– 15 August – LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, CG, “Analyzing Probate Records of
Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors”
– 19 September – Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL,”When Does Newfound Evidence
Overturn a Proved Conclusion?”
– 17 October, David Ouimette, CG, CGL,“Databases, Search Engines, and the
Genealogical Proof Standard”
– 21 November – Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG, “Research in Federal Records:
Some Assembly Required”
– 19 December – Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, “The Law and the Reasonably
Exhaustive (Re)Search”

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is excited to offer this webinar series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. These webinars will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics, the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

To register for any of these webinars, please visit our page at Legacy Family Tree Webinars: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:
office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG and http://BCGcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit:
http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Free BCG Lectures in Salt Lake City, 9 October 2015

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will offer a day of free skillbuilding genealogy lectures at the LDS Church History Museum, Salt Lake City, 9 October 2015. 

Renowned genealogists Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, Michael Hait, Thomas W. Jones, Elizabeth Shown Mills, Michael Ramage, and Judy G. Russell will present six one-hour skillbuilding lectures. The annual lectures, co-sponsored by BCG and the Family History Library, are free and open to the public. Anyone in Salt Lake City on that day is welcome to attend. The lectures will be presented live.

Friday, October 9, 2015, Church History Museum Auditorium (on West Temple next to the Family History Library)

9:00 a.m. – “What Is ‘Reasonably Exhaustive Research’?” Michael Hait, CG

10:15 a.m. – “The Art of Negative Space Research: Women,” Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG

11:30 a.m. – “After the Courthouse Burns: Rekindling Family History Through DNA,” Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

12:30 p.m. – One hour break

1:30 p.m. – “Forensic Genealogy Meets the Genealogical Proof Standard,” Michael Ramage, JD, CG

2:45 p.m. – “Margaret’s Baby’s Father and the Lessons He Taught Me (about Illegitimacy, Footloose Males, Burned Counties & More),” Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA

4:00 – “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?” Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA

“Whether you attend one skillbuilding lecture or all six, you will learn more about how to apply sound methodology to your genealogical research,” said BCG President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Education is part of this mission.”

For questions or more information contact office@BCGcertification.org.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer, are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.

Results of BCG Trustee Election

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) welcomes five trustees, two new and three re-elected.

Returning for another three-year term as BCG trustees are Alison Hare, CG; Debra S. Mieszala, CG; and Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL:

  • Hare, of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, has been certified since 1999. She presented a lecture on the 1854 London cholera epidemic at this year’s National Genealogical Society conference.
  • Mieszala, of Libertyville, Illinois, has been certified since 2002, blogs as The Advancing Genealogist, and specializes in forensic genealogy, twentieth-century research, and the Midwest.
  • Russell, of Avenel, New Jersey, has been certified since 2012 blogs as The Legal Genealogist, and speaks at conferences coast to coast. Judy serves as member-at-large on the BCG executive committee this year.

Joining them are two newly elected trustees:

  • Judy Kellar Fox, CG, of Aloha, Oregon, has been certified since 2007, co-edits BCG’s blog Springboard, and specializes in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and German research.
  • Richard G. Sayre, CG, CGL, of Herriman, Utah, has been certified since 2007, serves as BCG booth coordinator, and teaches military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, and government documents.

All fifteen trustees are Board-certified, and all serve without compensation. Five are elected by certified associates each year. The new trustees’ terms of office will begin at the end of the 10 October 2015 trustees’ meeting in Salt Lake City.

For questions or more information contact: Nicki Birch, CG, office@BCGcertification.org.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.

Certification Workshop at NGS 2015

SpringBoard, an official blogger for the 2015 NGS Family History Conference, is pleased to offer an overview of this certification workshop, presented Thursday, 14 May 2015:

T211: Certification: Measuring Yourself Against Standards, presented by Michael S. Ramage, JD, CG, Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, and Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

Why certify?

How to certify?

What are the components of a portfolio?

What characterizes a successful applicant?

What are the common mistakes made by unsuccessful applicants?

Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

These are among the questions addressed by trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists in its workshop “Certification: Measuring Yourself Against Standards,” conducted at the 2015 National Genealogical Society conference in St. Charles, Missouri.

Michael S. Ramage, JD, CG

Trustee and Board Treasurer Michael S. Ramage, JD, CG, Trustee and Executive Committee member-at-large Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, and Trustee and Past President Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, reviewed the certification process in depth for a packed room at the St. Charles Convention Center.

Attendees had the opportunity to ask questions about all of the required elements of the portfolio, the application process, and the judging rubrics.

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL

They also were among the first to learn of two changes in the application process, adopted by the Board of Trustees at its meeting last week:

First, the resume requirement will be updated, effective when the 2016 application guide is published, to require new applicants to “List the genealogy-related activities that helped you prepare for certification and in a sentence or two discuss how each activity helped you improve your (a) attainment of genealogical standards, (b) knowledge of genealogically-useful materials and contexts, (c) skills in reconstructing unknown or forgotten relationships, families, people, groups, and events, and (d) abilities to present your findings to others. Your discussion should cover formal and informal development activities in which you engaged. {Standards 82–83}.” This requirement, which will be evaluated by judges in the portfolio review process, is designed to ensure that applicants focus on the wide variety of educational opportunities available to assist in preparing for success as a genealogical researcher.

Second, and again effective when the 2016 application guide is published, new applications will be capped at 150 pages in length. This change will bring both electronically-submitted and hard-copy portfolios onto an identical footing, with both forms limited to 150 pages. (Double-sided printing is allowed, but each printed page counts: seventy-five pieces of paper printed on both sides equals 150 pages.) It will also serve to reinforce the guidance given to applicants that excellence is not inconsistent with brevity.

The two-hour, two-session workshop was recorded, and the audio tape will be available shortly for purchase through Jamb Tapes, Inc.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.

Skillbuilding: Russell on Living with Legal Lingo

SpringBoard, an official blogger for the 2015 NGS Family History Conference, is pleased to offer a review of this skillbuilding lecture, presented Thursday, 14 May 2015:

T251: Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL, “Living with Legal Lingo,” reviewed by B. Darrell Jackson, Ph.D., CG

In her usual engaging style, Judy Russell brings to life the necessity of understanding arcane and unfamiliar technical terms in order to properly interpret legal records encountered in genealogical research. Using eighteenth- and nineteenth-century documents involving Daniel Boone and members of his family, she highlights such terms as “indenture on the inquisition,” “escheator,” “coroner,” and “fieri facias,” to illustrate this necessity.

The process of interpreting legal records that Russell recommends is to become familiar with the context of the record, to discover the laws in effect at the time and in the place of the record, and to determine the meaning of the technical terms by use of appropriate reference works. On the latter, she is specific, beginning with Black’s Law Dictionary (no later than the 4th edition), John Bouvier’s earlier law dictionary (1839), and Giles Jacob’s even earlier dictionary (1729). These and other reference works are described and evaluated. The Georgetown Law Library is given the highest accolade as a comprehensive online source of legal reference works.

It is unlikely that anyone will come away from the lecture without being fully aware of the legal lingo that will be encountered in certain kinds of records, of how that lingo needs to be accurately understood, and of how to go about doing so. The use of Black’s, already a part of my repertoire, will now be supplemented by the other sources described in this informative and practical presentation.

A recording of this lecture may be ordered from Jamb Tapes, Inc.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.

NGS Conference Seminar: Measuring Yourself Against Standards

“Certification: Measuring Yourself Against Standards” is an interactive forum with three current BCG trustees. If you’ve been curious about what goes into preparation for BCG certification, here’s where you can ask questions and receive input about the process.

Thursday, 14 May 2015, 9:30am-12:00pm, Session T211

Successful candidates for certification often say that their attendance at certification seminars at national conferences was an integral part of preparing for their accomplishment. Yes, the seminars are taped and can be purchased and listened to later.  However, the supportive environment of a live audience with speakers allows participants to ask questions and get answers on the spot. BCG wants candidates to succeed! This double session demystifies the process and requirements by addressing concerns one by one.

The three trustees have a wide range of experiences among them. Two take clients, and one does not. Two had previous careers in the judicial system, and one did not. Two hold BCG’s Certified Genealogical Lecturer credential, and one does not. All became certified to test their work products against standards and learn ways to improve. All are dedicated to helping attendees answer the questions, “Am I ready?” and “Can I do this?” Come explore certification for yourself to better understand what is required to earn the post- nominal title of Certified Genealogist.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL

Michael Ramage, J.D., CG

Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, Michael Ramage, J.D., CG, and Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.