BCG Offers Free Webinar: “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 18 April, 8:00 p.m. Eastern “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

An often under used resource, evidence of kinship abounds in publications such as the Serial Set, American State Papers, and the Territorial Papers. We explore these publications and discover efficient ways to access them.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 18 April 2017.

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is a long-time researcher and instructor in genealogical topics. Rick is also a retired colonel having served 31 years in the U.S. Army. He coordinates the Using Maps in Genealogy course at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), and instructs in the Advanced Methodology, Techniques and Technology, and Advanced Military courses. Rick and his wife Pam coordinate the advanced land course and Researching in Washington, DC, without Leaving Home offered by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) and the advanced land course at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). Rick co-coordinates with Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, the Law School for Genealogists at GRIP and the FHL Law Library course at SLIG. He also lectures at national conferences and presents nationwide seminars. His areas of expertise encompass records of the National Archives, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Daughters of the American Revolution, including military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, and government documents. Rick is experienced in the localities of western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rick is also a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

“We are pleased to offer these educational opportunities to the community,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

Register for “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA before 18 April 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3315192862998203905.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg  and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 21 March, 8:00 p.m. Eastern  “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG

This lecture reviews tactics for sorting our ancestors from other men or women of the same name in the same general time period and location.  Several case studies show how these methods were effective.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 21 March 2017.

Rebecca Whitman Koford holds a Certified Genealogist credential. Her focus is in American research with special emphasis in Maryland. She has been taking clients and lecturing since 2004. She has spoken for the National Genealogical Society Conference, Maryland State Archives, and for groups in Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Delaware. She is a board member of the Maryland Genealogical Society and volunteers at the Family History Center in Frederick, Maryland. She has published articles in the NGS Magazine and the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal. She is a graduate of the ProGen Study Group, an online peer-led study program based on the book Professional Genealogy by Elizabeth Shown Mills; she was appointed ProGen Administrator in January 2015. Rebecca is currently very enthusiastic about the Society of Preservation Patriots project sponsored by FGS, an effort to digitize original military records from the National Archives. Rebecca lives in Mt. Airy, Maryland, with three active teenagers and a very patient husband.

“We are pleased to offer these educational opportunities to the community,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

Register for “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG, before 21 March 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6102864957247405057.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg  and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars . For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

 

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR: “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG

This lecture will illustrate how to integrate each element of the Genealogical Proof Standard in a proof argument that relies heavily on autosomal DNA test results to answer a relationship research question. The examples are drawn from “Rafael Arriaga, A Mexican Father in Michigan: Autosomal DNA Helps Identify Paternity” from the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (June 2016).

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 21 February 2017.

Karen Stanbary, CG, holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Chicago. She specializes in Midwestern, Chicago, and Mexican research as well as complex problem-solving and DNA analysis. A regular instructor in Chicago’s Newberry Library Adult Education program, Karen lectures on topics including Genetic Genealogy, Advanced Genetic Genealogy, and the Genealogical Proof Standard.  She is a faculty member at GRIP, IGHR, and SLIG. She published a complex evidence case study incorporating traditional documentary research and autosomal DNA analysis in the June 2016 issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly.

She holds the Certified Genealogist credential from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves on the Genetic Genealogy Standards committee.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, before 21 February 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1253173154332404739.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars and here. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Writing Up Your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 17 January, 8:00 p.m. Eastern “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

Writing up our research is the best way to preserve it. This presentation will examine different ways of writing and publishing, from blogs to books.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m.EDT, 17 January 2017.

Michael J. Leclerc, CG, is an internationally renowned genealogist. He has authored numerous articles for genealogy magazines and scholarly journals, and is a popular presenter at conferences and seminars around the world.

Michael worked in a variety of capacities at the New England Historic Genealogical Society for 17 years prior to joining Mocavo as Chief Genealogist in 2012. He left there in 2015 to start Genealogy Professor ( www.genprof.net), where he helps to provide genealogy education opportunities to family historians. He has edited several books, including Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century: A Guide to Register Style and More, Second Edition, with Henry Hoff, and the fifth edition of the seminal guidebook Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research. He was a contributing editor for American Ancestors magazine, and a consulting editor for The New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Michael has served on the boards of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Federation of Genealogical Societies. You can reach him at www.mjleclerc.com and www.Facebook.com/michaeljleclerc.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG, before17 January 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7771888423857682691.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit:http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

 

The dog that did bark

(Crossposted from The Legal Genealogist)

Ooooops…

The Legal Genealogist (Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL) had an absolute ball last night giving a webinar for the Board for Certification of Genealogists, through Legacy Family Tree Webinars, on negative evidence.

It’s available online right now and for a few days will be free to review; afterwards, it’ll still be available for a small fee.

Now…

It’s true that negative evidence can be a tough topic, because even experienced genealogists can get confused about the exact distinction between direct, indirect and negative evidence in a particular situation.

negativeDirect evidence, of course, is information that appears to answer a research question by itself.1 The example I used was from the 1850 U.S. census of Yancey County, North Carolina, with the research question of “what did Charles Baker do for a living?” The census reports his occupation as High Sheriff.2 That surely gives us the answer, by itself, and so it’s direct evidence.

But if the research question is “where was the Baker family living when Rebecca was born?”, we have a different situation. The census does tell us she was born in North Carolina,3 so surely that’s where her mother was at that moment — but it doesn’t tell us that’s where the family was living at the time. They could have been just passing through, or visiting with relatives or friends.

So we’d need to combine the birthplace with other evidence of residence to answer the question and that — by definition — makes it indirect evidence: a bit of information that has to be combined with other bits to answer the question.4

Negative evidence is another beastie: it’s a “type of evidence arising from an absence of a situation or information in extant records where that information might be expected.”5 In the words of the Sherlock Holmes story, it’s the dog that didn’t bark — when it should have barked — if what we thought was true was in fact true.6

Sometimes we get confused when we search for something — say, a particular person in a census — and we can’t find him, so we think that’s negative evidence. Nope. That’s just a negative search — we don’t have any basis yet for drawing an inference about what it means that we couldn’t find him. Maybe his entry was misindexed. Maybe the census taker skipped over that household. We just don’t know — and we don’t have a basis for speculating.

And sometimes — sigh — we get confused and think that evidence that negatives a proposition — that tends to disprove it — is negative evidence.

As — sigh — I did when one question came up at the end in the Q&A.

The question was whether DNA results could be negative evidence, and, in my answer, the example I used of a case that could be negative evidence… isn’t.

The example I used was a YDNA test. My Shew line from North Carolina against another Shew-Schuh line from Virginia. We had every reason to believe, based on the paper trail, that the Philip who disappeared from the records of Virginia right around the time that my Philip appeared in the records of North Carolina was one and the same Philip.

But YDNA testing thoroughly disproved that working hypothesis. Looking at just the very top level YDNA results — the haplogroup, or which branch of the male human family tree the test takers are sitting on7 — it’s not so: the Virginia line has a haplogroup of R, and my Shew line has a haplogroup of I — and you can’t have two lines descending from the same common male ancestor with two different haplogroups.

That’s not negative evidence.

It does in fact directly answer the research question: “Are the two Shew lines related through the direct paternal line?” The dog did bark — we got an answer to our research question. And the fact that the answer is in the negative (“no, they’re not”) doesn’t change it from direct evidence to negative evidence.

There may be situations where, perhaps, DNA evidence might be put in the negative evidence category. If so, however, it’s not going to be in any case where the DNA test merely disproves a research theory. Any time a test can directly show a relationship (“yes, two people are related”) or debunk a theorized relationship (“no, two people aren’t related, at least not in this way”), it’s direct evidence — even when the answer is no.


SOURCES

1. See Board for Certification of Genealogists, Genealogy Standards (Nashville, Tennessee : Ancestry, 2014), 66.

2. 1850 U.S. census, Yancey County, North Carolina, population schedule, p. 450(A) (stamped), dwelling 975, family 967, Charles Baker; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Dec 2016); citing National Archive microfilm publication M432, roll 407.

3. Ibid., Rebecca A. E. Baker.

4. See Board for Certification of Genealogists, Genealogy Standards, at 70.

5. Ibid., at 71.

6. See A. Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of Silver Blaze,” Strand Magazine (July-December 1892) IV: 645; digital images, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 4 Dec 2016).

7. ISOGG Wiki (http://www.isogg.org/wiki), “Haplogroup,” rev. 4 Oct 2016.

BCG Webinars for 2017

The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to announce its webinar line-up for 2017. All webinars will be broadcast by Legacy Webinars, and held on the third Tuesday of the month at 8pm Eastern. The webinar schedule is as follows:

– 17 January – Michael Leclerc, CG, “Writing up your Research”
– 21 February – Karen Stanbary, CG, “Weaving DNA Test Results into a
Proof Argument”
– 21 March – Rebecca Koford, CG, “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same
Name”
– 18 April – Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, “The Genealogy in Government Documents”
– 16 May – Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL, “MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA
with the GPS”
– 20 June – Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, “Beating the Bushes: Using the
GPS to Find Jacob Bush’s Father”
– 18 July – Angela Packer McGhie, CG, “Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas
for Further Research”
– 15 August – LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, CG, “Analyzing Probate Records of
Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors”
– 19 September – Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL,”When Does Newfound Evidence
Overturn a Proved Conclusion?”
– 17 October, David Ouimette, CG, CGL,“Databases, Search Engines, and the
Genealogical Proof Standard”
– 21 November – Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG, “Research in Federal Records:
Some Assembly Required”
– 19 December – Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, “The Law and the Reasonably
Exhaustive (Re)Search”

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is excited to offer this webinar series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. These webinars will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics, the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

To register for any of these webinars, please visit our page at Legacy Family Tree Webinars: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:
office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG and http://BCGcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit:
http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR: “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

“No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t”
by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL Tuesday, 20 December, 8 p.m. Eastern

Negative evidence is the hardest type of evidence to understand or use in genealogical research. By definition, a “type of evidence arising from an absence of a situation or information in extant records where that information might be expected,” it is, as the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes told us in the short story “Silver Blaze,” the “curious incident . . . in the night-time”—the thing we would expect to see or hear but that just isn’t there. Learn more about what negative evidence is—and what it isn’t—and how to use it.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 20 December 2016.

A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, until recently, Judy was an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother’s side and entirely in Germany on her father’s side. Visit her website at www.legalgenealogist.com.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, before 20 December 2016 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/529243703022691843

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars.
For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, November 15, 8:00 p.m. Eastern
“Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History”
by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

Notarial records—legal documents created by civil law notaries—are a valuable resource in areas of the world such as Louisiana, Mexico, French Canada, and Italy. Property deeds (land, personal, or agricultural), mortgages, wills, dowries, late birth registrations, marriage permissions, and many other types of documents can be found within this record set.

These records often provide key details about a family, their relationships, and financial transactions which cannot be found within any other type of genealogical resource.

Understanding the procedures behind the preparation of these documents is key to understanding their method of conservation, the formats the documents will be found in, and the contents therein. This lecture will provide examples of several Italian and French documents that are particularly descriptive and which provide key details on the families being researched.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 15 November 2016.

Melanie D. Holtz, CG, is a board-certified genealogist, lecturer, and writer with a specialty in Italian genealogy and Italian-American dual citizenship. With offices in both the U.S. and Italy, she provides her clients with a wide range of services, including Italian ancestral tours.

Melanie is also a co-administrator of the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research and the author of several courses on Italian genealogy available through Family Tree University and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, before 15 November 2016 at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3105017916039030787

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:

office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit:

http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

 

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

 

BCG Webinar Update: Fonkert on Identity

Jay Fonkert’s March 2016 BCG webinar, “Genealogical Fingerprints: Merging and Separating Identities in Family History Research,” is now accessible on demand from Vimeo. It is available for twenty-four-hour rental ($2.99) or for purchase of unlimited streaming and download ($12.99).

Go to the BCG Webinars tab at the top of this page for free previews and links to Vimeo recordings of all BCG webinars.

BCG Webinars are generally presented the third Tuesday of the month. Watch SpringBoard and Facebook for notices about two weeks before each webinar.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Free BCG Webinar: Baker on Finding Your Early 1800s US Ancestors Online

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Finding Your Early 1800s US Ancestors Online,” a webinar by James M. Baker, PhD, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, 19 April 2016.

This presentation describes strategies to find early 1800s United States data. A case study illustrates the use of different record types to trace families backward in time from Illinois through Indiana, Ohio, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Key online sources include newspapers, historical books, property records, marriage records, military records, and city directories.

James M. Baker has been an active genealogist for the past fifteen years. He earned a PhD in sociology and social psychology from the University of Utah. In 2011, he became a board-certified genealogist. He specializes in German, Midwestern US, and early American genealogy research.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address questions regarding the genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

There is no charge, but space is limited. Register for James M. Baker, PhD, CG, “Finding Your Early 1800s US Ancestors Online,” on 19 April 2016 at 8:00 p.m. EDT (7:00 CDT, 6:00 MDT, 5:00 PDT).

Register early and sign in early to claim your space. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact office@bcgcertification.org.

Learn about BCG’s previous webinars at SpringBoard‘s webinar page.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.