BCG Offers Free Webinar: “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 18 April, 8:00 p.m. Eastern “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

An often under used resource, evidence of kinship abounds in publications such as the Serial Set, American State Papers, and the Territorial Papers. We explore these publications and discover efficient ways to access them.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 18 April 2017.

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is a long-time researcher and instructor in genealogical topics. Rick is also a retired colonel having served 31 years in the U.S. Army. He coordinates the Using Maps in Genealogy course at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), and instructs in the Advanced Methodology, Techniques and Technology, and Advanced Military courses. Rick and his wife Pam coordinate the advanced land course and Researching in Washington, DC, without Leaving Home offered by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) and the advanced land course at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). Rick co-coordinates with Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, the Law School for Genealogists at GRIP and the FHL Law Library course at SLIG. He also lectures at national conferences and presents nationwide seminars. His areas of expertise encompass records of the National Archives, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Daughters of the American Revolution, including military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, and government documents. Rick is experienced in the localities of western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rick is also a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

“We are pleased to offer these educational opportunities to the community,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

Register for “The Genealogy in Government Documents” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA before 18 April 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3315192862998203905.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg  and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 21 March, 8:00 p.m. Eastern  “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG

This lecture reviews tactics for sorting our ancestors from other men or women of the same name in the same general time period and location.  Several case studies show how these methods were effective.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 21 March 2017.

Rebecca Whitman Koford holds a Certified Genealogist credential. Her focus is in American research with special emphasis in Maryland. She has been taking clients and lecturing since 2004. She has spoken for the National Genealogical Society Conference, Maryland State Archives, and for groups in Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Delaware. She is a board member of the Maryland Genealogical Society and volunteers at the Family History Center in Frederick, Maryland. She has published articles in the NGS Magazine and the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal. She is a graduate of the ProGen Study Group, an online peer-led study program based on the book Professional Genealogy by Elizabeth Shown Mills; she was appointed ProGen Administrator in January 2015. Rebecca is currently very enthusiastic about the Society of Preservation Patriots project sponsored by FGS, an effort to digitize original military records from the National Archives. Rebecca lives in Mt. Airy, Maryland, with three active teenagers and a very patient husband.

“We are pleased to offer these educational opportunities to the community,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

Register for “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name” by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG, before 21 March 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6102864957247405057.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg  and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars . For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

 

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR: “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG

This lecture will illustrate how to integrate each element of the Genealogical Proof Standard in a proof argument that relies heavily on autosomal DNA test results to answer a relationship research question. The examples are drawn from “Rafael Arriaga, A Mexican Father in Michigan: Autosomal DNA Helps Identify Paternity” from the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (June 2016).

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 21 February 2017.

Karen Stanbary, CG, holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Chicago. She specializes in Midwestern, Chicago, and Mexican research as well as complex problem-solving and DNA analysis. A regular instructor in Chicago’s Newberry Library Adult Education program, Karen lectures on topics including Genetic Genealogy, Advanced Genetic Genealogy, and the Genealogical Proof Standard.  She is a faculty member at GRIP, IGHR, and SLIG. She published a complex evidence case study incorporating traditional documentary research and autosomal DNA analysis in the June 2016 issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly.

She holds the Certified Genealogist credential from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves on the Genetic Genealogy Standards committee.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, before 21 February 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1253173154332404739.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars and here. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Writing Up Your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 17 January, 8:00 p.m. Eastern “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

Writing up our research is the best way to preserve it. This presentation will examine different ways of writing and publishing, from blogs to books.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m.EDT, 17 January 2017.

Michael J. Leclerc, CG, is an internationally renowned genealogist. He has authored numerous articles for genealogy magazines and scholarly journals, and is a popular presenter at conferences and seminars around the world.

Michael worked in a variety of capacities at the New England Historic Genealogical Society for 17 years prior to joining Mocavo as Chief Genealogist in 2012. He left there in 2015 to start Genealogy Professor ( www.genprof.net), where he helps to provide genealogy education opportunities to family historians. He has edited several books, including Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century: A Guide to Register Style and More, Second Edition, with Henry Hoff, and the fifth edition of the seminal guidebook Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research. He was a contributing editor for American Ancestors magazine, and a consulting editor for The New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Michael has served on the boards of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Federation of Genealogical Societies. You can reach him at www.mjleclerc.com and www.Facebook.com/michaeljleclerc.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Writing up your Research” by Michael J. Leclerc, CG, before17 January 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7771888423857682691.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit:http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

 

Coming from OnBoard, January 2017

OnBoard: Newsletter of the Board for Certification of Genealogists is scheduled to publish in January 2017. We’re pleased to offer a preview of some of its content.

OnBoard Jan 2017 masthead

 

“The Role of Background Context in Document Analysis”

Most family historians have found documents that contain puzzling or unexpected information. Document analysis is an essential skill needed for successful genealogical research. Melinda Daffin Henningfield, CG, shows how expanding our research to include background context can help us to meet the first element of the Genealogical Proof Standard and to solve our family mysteries.

“Genealogy Ethics and the Call for Diversity”

Drawing from principles set out in the Genealogist’s Code,[[1]] LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG, begins a conversation about the call for diversity in the field of genealogy. Her article explores a timely question of crucial importance to genealogy as a profession and to the diverse members of our community.

OnBoard publishes three issues per year. A subscription is included in annual associate fees and is provided to applicants “on the clock.” Subscriptions are also available to the general public for $15.00 per year (currently) through the BCG website, here <http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/bcgitems.html>. Issues back to 1995 can also be ordered online, here <http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/backordlst.html>.

 

[1] Board for Certification of Genealogists, Genealogy Standards (Nashville, Tenn.: Ancestry, 2014), Appendix A: The Genealogist’s Code, 45–48.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Webinars for 2017

The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to announce its webinar line-up for 2017. All webinars will be broadcast by Legacy Webinars, and held on the third Tuesday of the month at 8pm Eastern. The webinar schedule is as follows:

– 17 January – Michael Leclerc, CG, “Writing up your Research”
– 21 February – Karen Stanbary, CG, “Weaving DNA Test Results into a
Proof Argument”
– 21 March – Rebecca Koford, CG, “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same
Name”
– 18 April – Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, “The Genealogy in Government Documents”
– 16 May – Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL, “MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA
with the GPS”
– 20 June – Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, “Beating the Bushes: Using the
GPS to Find Jacob Bush’s Father”
– 18 July – Angela Packer McGhie, CG, “Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas
for Further Research”
– 15 August – LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, CG, “Analyzing Probate Records of
Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors”
– 19 September – Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL,”When Does Newfound Evidence
Overturn a Proved Conclusion?”
– 17 October, David Ouimette, CG, CGL,“Databases, Search Engines, and the
Genealogical Proof Standard”
– 21 November – Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG, “Research in Federal Records:
Some Assembly Required”
– 19 December – Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, “The Law and the Reasonably
Exhaustive (Re)Search”

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is excited to offer this webinar series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. These webinars will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics, the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

To register for any of these webinars, please visit our page at Legacy Family Tree Webinars: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:
office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG and http://BCGcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit:
http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Diverse Communities: Finding Irish Immigrant Origins

Finding Irish Immigrant Origins

by Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG, FGBS[1]

The United States is a nation of immigrants, and most people who research them hope to eventually learn from where those immigrants came. Successfully identifying an Irish immigrant’s point of origin depends on factors such as the immigrant’s religion, occupation, relative wealth, social prominence, migration path, and place of settlement; the period of immigration; and unique qualities of the given name and surname.

All the commonly used sources should be considered when tracing an Irish immigrant, but the usefulness of some of those sources may be limited:

  • Many poor famine-era Irish settled in cities and did not own property, and therefore might not be found in deeds, real estate tax rolls, or probate records.
  • Arrival and naturalization records from the period in which the majority of Irish immigrants came to the United States contain less detail than those for later periods.
  • Most Irish immigrants were Roman Catholic. Depending on the diocese, Catholic sacramental registers may be in local custody with access restricted to parish staff. Locating and using church records, therefore, can be challenging.
  • City dwellers with common names are difficult to distinguish in directories and censuses, as many of them had similar occupations.

Irish places of origin are sometimes mentioned in obituaries, carved on grave markers, or listed in sacramental registers. While many vital, census, and military records state only “Ireland” as a place of birth, occasionally something more specific is found. Some researchers may never discover a source that names the place of origin; others may encounter multiple records identifying the place.

Irish immigrants typically had close ties to their places of origin. They identified with their townlands or towns. They may have settled near and socialized with other people who came from the same area. In some cases this was a result of “chain migration,” where later immigrants chose a place of settlement based on information received from those who went earlier. Frequently, the earliest immigrant in an Irish family was a young, single woman who could find employment as a live-in domestic servant—and therefore was able to save most of her earnings to pay for passage for another member of her family.

When no source is found naming an Irish place of birth, records related to the immigrant’s network of associates should be explored. An immigrant’s siblings, cousins, or other relatives may have settled in different areas and created different types of records that provide helpful information. A family member who was well-to-do may have been able to afford a grave marker naming a point of origin. A poor relative may have been admitted to an almshouse where records document a place of birth. Even searching for known family members who remained in Ireland can help pinpoint an immigrant’s roots.

Networks of associates extend beyond family. Witnesses, sponsors, co-workers, neighbors, fellow parishioners, and friends may have ties to the immigrant’s home. Some urban neighborhoods comprised people with common origins; some rural settlements were the result of group migration. Studying the history of the immigrant’s new home may provide general information, if not specifics, about a point of origin. Immigration history can also offer clues. For example, approximately two-thirds of the Irish who came to the United States between the end of the Revolutionary War and 1814 were from Ulster province.[2]

Most of the population of Ireland remained in one location for generation after generation, so identifying a place in which a surname occurred historically can lead to successful identification of a point of origin. Some names, such as Kelly, are found all over Ireland, but others are found in specific counties or regions. If the immigrant’s family and associates include several people with surnames that can be linked to the same general area in Ireland, strong indirect evidence exists of a connection to that area.

Whether there is direct evidence about an immigrant’s point of origin, a few hints pointing to a general area, or no clue whatsoever, eventually Irish sources should be added to the research plan. As in United States research, records that are available and relevant depend on the specific situation: time period, location, religion, social status, and relative wealth. If a specific place is known or suspected, sources unique to that place should be pursued. Grenham’s Tracing Your Irish Ancestors and Ryan’s Irish Records include county-by-county lists of sources, and Flyleaf Press (http://www.flyleaf.ie/) publishes a series of books addressing research in select Irish counties. Most Irish counties have one or more heritage centres staffed by people who are knowledgeable about resources for that area.

If little to no information is known about the immigrant’s home in Ireland, priority should be given to sources covering a large part of the population and having broad-ranging indexes, such as church records and civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths.

Civil registration of vital events began in 1864 for all of Ireland,[3] and indexes cover the entire country.[4] Immigrants who left Ireland after the start of civil registration, therefore, can more easily be linked to their Irish origins than those who left earlier. Uncommon names are easier to work with and the more information that is known (about both the subject and his or her family) the better the chance for success. If an immigrant couple married in Ireland after the start of civil registration, then cross-referencing the surnames of the bride and groom in the index can sometimes point to an Irish area of interest. If the immigrant left before the start of civil registration, a search for records of siblings, cousins, or other relatives who remained in Ireland may prove worthwhile. Indexes are available through FamilySearch.org, Findmypast.com, Rootsireland.ie, IrishGenealogy.ie, and the General Register Office of Northern Ireland. IrishGenealogy.ie’s indexes link to images of the original records in many cases; additional images will be added in the future.

Church records cover a period prior to the start of civil registration, but finding and using the records is not always straightforward. Starting dates, coverage, and record locations vary. In rural Ireland, Roman Catholic registers begin about 1820, but most parishes have gaps in coverage. Presbyterian ministers were required to keep records beginning in 1819; registers predating that year are rare. Those from Church of Ireland parishes have earlier starting dates, but many were lost in the 1922 fire at the Public Records Office.

Indexes and abstracts of Irish church records are available online. It is sometimes possible to locate a church record of a baptism or marriage when nothing more than names and approximate dates are known. For example, Rootsireland.ie and IrishGenealogy.ie offer indexes to collections of Roman Catholic, Church of Ireland, Methodist, Presbyterian, and other churches. Ancestry.com and Findmypast.com provide indexes to digitized Roman Catholic registers found in the National Library of Ireland. Given their individual strengths and weaknesses, it is wise to check all known indexes.

Censuses for 1901 and 1911 are available for all of Ireland, but only fragments of earlier censuses survive. Existing census records may be searched using an index at the website of the National Archives of Ireland.[5]

Valuation records were compiled beginning in the nineteenth century. They were used to establish a uniform assessment of property to determine the amount of tax due. Records identify each holding’s occupier and immediate lessor. If an immigrant’s place of origin is not known, these country-wide tax valuation records can be used to identify places where the surname was found. John Grenham’s “Irish Surnames” tool allows users to search for civil parishes in which one or more related surnames appear together, offering a clue about possible origins.[6]

Sources and strategies for researching Irish immigrants in the United States are similar to those used for researching other immigrant groups, but identifying the immigrants’ points of origin can be more complicated than for later-arriving groups. Determining an immigrant’s Irish birthplace usually requires extensive research in U.S. records, studying the immigrant’s network of associates, and using indexed Irish records to pinpoint places of potential interest. Success sometimes comes quickly, but more often it requires hard work and careful analysis.

 

Suggested Reading

Books

Falley, Margaret Dickson. Irish and Scotch-Irish Ancestral Research: A Guide to the Genealogical Records, Methods, and Sources in Ireland. 3 vols. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1980.

Grenham, John. Tracing Your Irish Ancestors: The Complete Guide. 4th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 2012.

Miller, Kerby A. Emigrants and Exiles: Ireland and the Irish Exodus to North America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Radford, Dwight A., and Kyle J. Betit. A Genealogist’s Guide to Discovering Your Irish Ancestors: How to Find and Record Your Unique Heritage. Cincinnati: Betterway Books, 2001.

Reilly, James R. Richard Griffith and His Valuations of Ireland. Baltimore: Clearfield, 2007.

Ryan, James G. Irish Church Records: Their History, Availability, and Use in Family and Local History Research. 2nd ed. Glenageary, County Dublin, Ireland: Flyleaf Press, 2001.

———. Irish Records: Sources for Family and Local History. Rev. ed. Dublin: Flyleaf Press/Ancestry, 1999.

 Journals and Magazines

The Irish at Home and Abroad.

Published 1993–1999. For a subject index, see “Index to The Irish at Home and Abroad,” FamilySearch Wiki (https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Index_to_The_Irish_at_Home_and_Abroad ).

The Irish Genealogist.

Published by the Irish Genealogical Research Society (http://www.irishancestors.ie/?page_id=437). For a name index, 1937–2001, see http://www.irishancestors.ie/?page_id=3039 .

Irish Lives Remembered.

http://www.irishlivesremembered.ie

Irish Roots.

http://www.irishrootsmedia.com

Blogs

Buggy, Joseph. Townland of Origin: Irish Genealogical Research in North America (blog). http://www.townlandoforigin.com

Grenham, John. Irish Roots (blog). http://www.johngrenham.com/blog/

Moughty, Donna. Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources (blog). http://moughty.com/blog/

Santry, Claire. Irish Genealogy News (blog). http://www.irishgenealogynews.com

Websites

General Register Office. https://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/General-Register-Office.aspx

General Register Office of Northern Ireland. https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/information-and-services/family-history-heritage-and-museums/research-family-history-general

Grenham, John. Irish Ancestors. https://www.johngrenham.com

Irish Family History Centre. https://irishfamilyhistorycentre.com

Irishgenealogy.ie. http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/

National Archives of Ireland. http://www.nationalarchives.ie

Irish Essay Writing Service. https://topgradeessay.com

National Library of Ireland. http://www.nli.ie

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI). https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni

RootsIreland.ie. http://www.rootsireland.ie

Santry, Claire. Irish Genealogy Toolkit. http://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit.com

Waldron, Paddy. Irish Civil Registration: How to Find Records of BMDs etc. http://pwaldron.info/CivilReg.html

 

[1] With thanks to Polly FitzGerald Kimmitt, CG, and Suzanne McVetty, CG, FGBS, for their helpful suggestions. All URLs were valid as of 6 December 2016.

[2] Kerby A. Miller, Emigrants and Exiles: Ireland and the Irish Exodus to North America. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 169–70.

[3] Non-Catholic marriages, however, were recorded beginning in 1845.

[4] Northern Ireland was formed in 1922. Beginning that year, vital records for the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland are separate.

[5] “Census of Ireland 1901/1911 and Census fragments and substitutes, 1821–51,” National Archives of Ireland (http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/).

[6] John Grenham, “Irish Surnames,” Irish Ancestors (https://www.johngrenham.com/surnames/).

 

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR: “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

“No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t”
by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL Tuesday, 20 December, 8 p.m. Eastern

Negative evidence is the hardest type of evidence to understand or use in genealogical research. By definition, a “type of evidence arising from an absence of a situation or information in extant records where that information might be expected,” it is, as the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes told us in the short story “Silver Blaze,” the “curious incident . . . in the night-time”—the thing we would expect to see or hear but that just isn’t there. Learn more about what negative evidence is—and what it isn’t—and how to use it.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 20 December 2016.

A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, until recently, Judy was an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother’s side and entirely in Germany on her father’s side. Visit her website at www.legalgenealogist.com.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn’t” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, before 20 December 2016 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/529243703022691843

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars.
For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, November 15, 8:00 p.m. Eastern
“Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History”
by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

Notarial records—legal documents created by civil law notaries—are a valuable resource in areas of the world such as Louisiana, Mexico, French Canada, and Italy. Property deeds (land, personal, or agricultural), mortgages, wills, dowries, late birth registrations, marriage permissions, and many other types of documents can be found within this record set.

These records often provide key details about a family, their relationships, and financial transactions which cannot be found within any other type of genealogical resource.

Understanding the procedures behind the preparation of these documents is key to understanding their method of conservation, the formats the documents will be found in, and the contents therein. This lecture will provide examples of several Italian and French documents that are particularly descriptive and which provide key details on the families being researched.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 15 November 2016.

Melanie D. Holtz, CG, is a board-certified genealogist, lecturer, and writer with a specialty in Italian genealogy and Italian-American dual citizenship. With offices in both the U.S. and Italy, she provides her clients with a wide range of services, including Italian ancestral tours.

Melanie is also a co-administrator of the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research and the author of several courses on Italian genealogy available through Family Tree University and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, before 15 November 2016 at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3105017916039030787

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact:

office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit:

http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG

 

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

 

Coming from OnBoard, September 2016

OnBoard: Newsletter of the Board for Certification of Genealogists is scheduled to publish in September 2016. We’re pleased to offer a preview of some of its content.

“Standards and Forensic Genealogy”

Forensic genealogists use genealogical skills and methods to help resolve legal problems. Most practitioners of the specialty provide expert opinions relied on by legal professionals. Giving us a look into the world of forensic genealogy, Michael S. Ramage, JD, CG, explains how adherence to the principles in Genealogy Standards underlies success in forensic work.

“Investigating and Evaluating Family Artifacts”

Genealogists who are lucky enough to have inherited a cherished heirloom may wonder about its background. Pam Stone Eagleson, CG, shows how thorough research and applying genealogy standards and guidelines used by museum curators and educators can reveal the stories behind our family artifacts.

OnBoard publishes three issues per year. A subscription is included in annual associate fees and is provided to applicants “on the clock.” Subscriptions are also available to the general public for $15.00 per year (currently) through the BCG website, here. Issues back to 1995 can also be ordered online, here.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.