Please Welcome Christy Stringfield, CG

Christy Stringfield

Christy Stringfield is a full-time fifth grade teacher. She recently returned to her childhood love of genealogy. She remembers being 8 years old and sitting at the kitchen table watching as her Great Aunt filled out an application to the Daughters of the American Revolution. Throughout high school and college she interviewed family members and collected and transcribed artifacts. All that was set aside as her children grew and she started her teaching career. When Christy returned to genealogy, the field had changed and she was able to use computers and online resources.

Already working in a field with strict certification requirements, Christy looked to the Board for Certification of Genealogists as a way to perfect her skills. “I read every professional book I could get my hands on to prepare myself for certification, all the while working on items for my own files that I could use in my portfolio,” Christy remembers. Finally she joined the DAR herself, where she volunteered in genealogical research for the trickier applications, not long thereafter becoming the chapter’s Registrar.

Christy specializes in New England and Mid-Western genealogy and lineage applications. At this time, she only take paid clients who are working on Supplemental applications to the DAR.

Her advice to anyone considering applying to BCG is “Do it! But complete as much as you can -- at least through a first or second draft – before you officially become on-the-clock. I had everything ‘finished’ before I sent in my application. Then I used the advice on the message boards to modify, revise, and rewrite some sections before sending in the final portfolio.”

This teacher’s advice to applicants is to know how they learn best. If they are visual learners, read books, study genealogical journals, and visual genealogical proof maps. For auditory learners, attend seminars, conferences, and lectures. Kinesthetic learners can find mentors, gets hands-on experience in libraries, archives, and courthouses, and learn to write things down and cite them properly.

Looking towards the future, Christy often sets new goals for herself. She is working to establish at least ten new Patriot lines that are not yet in the DAR database, and she is developing presentations for genealogy workshops. She feels that Board-certification will give her more confidence in moving forward and in contributing to the broad genealogical community.


(CG or Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.)

 

Welcome to Board-Certified Genealogist Nora Galvin

Claire Ammon, CG, and Fred Hart, CG, FASG, joined Nora Galvin, CG, at the annual meeting of Connecticut Ancestry Society. Photograph © Robert Locke, used with permission.

In April 2014, Nora became Connecticut’s third Board-certified Genealogist. Nora combines her professional work in Connecticut and Irish research and genetic genealogy with activities in local genealogy societies. She is journal editor and past president of Connecticut Ancestry Society, board member of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists, president of the Connecticut Professional Genealogists Council, and editor of the e-zine of the New England Regional Genealogical Conference. In her past career as a biologist, Nora worked in laboratory research for a pharmaceutical company and as a high school biology teacher.

When asked about advice she would give to those considering certification, Nora suggested finding as many varied genealogical experiences as possible. She said,

I worked as a professional for five years before I began to feel I might be ready to start on my portfolio. My own family research taught me about the “known knowns” and the “known unknowns” but it was my client work that taught me about the “unknown unknowns.” (Apologies to Donald Rumsfeld.) I thought I was getting a “feeling for the organism,” the title of a book about biologist Barbara McClintock. It captures the sense of knowledge that I had to develop to be ready to get that portfolio put together.

With tongue in cheek, Nora also advises starting your genealogy career early. She took time to be a high school teacher, a stay-at-home mother, and a research scientist. She started genealogy research about twelve years ago and set up her business soon after, in 2006.

Where does she see her career going now that she is Board-certified? She will have fewer clients but bigger projects and she will be able to devote more time to editing Connecticut Ancestry. Travel to Ireland for research is also in the cards. She admits to being at first skeptical of the hype around autosomal DNA testing, but is now a convert. She enjoys applying her scientific background to genetic genealogy.

Her genealogy heroes are “The people who dig, dig, dig and put together amazing work.” In New England, she admires the work of Robert Charles Anderson on the Great Migration Project, and that of Helen Ullmann, who has transcribed countless almost illegible early records so that others can use them easily. She also admires the family historians who call themselves amateurs but who turn out wonderful narratives documenting their ancestors.

In Connecticut, vital records, town records, and land records are kept by the town clerks. The Connecticut Professional Genealogists Council has worked for decades to provide support and improve communications with the Town Clerks Association. CPGC instigated legislation to provide funds for records preservation at the town level as well as legislation to clearly state genealogical access to vital records. Nora is a member of the Town Clerks and Genealogists Action Committee as well as a member of the consortium of Connecticut genealogical societies. She has testified before legislative committees regarding open records and continues to advocate for preservation and access.


(CG or Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.)

Nora in the vault in Manchester Town Hall, admiring a book of records preserved with funds stemming from legislation instigated by Connecticut genealogists. Photograph © Barbara Mathews, used with permission.

BCG at FGS

The Board for Certification of Genealogists will be Gone to Texas August 27-30 for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference in San Antonio, Texas.

BCG will have a booth in the vendor hall where information about certification and standards will be available, and where those considering certification can review portfolios.

And Board-certified genealogists will take to the podium in large numbers. Scheduled presentations by associates include:

Wednesday, August 27

Strong Business Strategy = Sound Society Strategy
by David E. Rencher AG, CG, and Ed Donakey

The Dotted Line: Sign Before Other Steps
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Calling All Society Webmasters: Past, Present, and Future
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Volunteering from a Distance
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Thursday, August 28

Making Sense of It All: Critical Thinking for Genealogists
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

Finding Hidden Manuscripts Throughout the Trans-Mississippi South
by J. Mark Lowe CG

BCG Luncheon: Genealogy Standards: Fine Wine in a New Bottle
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Workshop: Maps! Wonderful Maps!
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL, Richard G (Rick) Sayre CG, CGL

Poor? Black? Female? Southern Research Strategies (2-hour session)
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

Workshop: German Gothic Handwriting-Anyone Can Read It!
by F. Warren Bittner CG

Finding Freedmen Marriage Records
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Inferential Genealogy
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

A Family for Isabella: Indirect Evidence from Texas back to Mississippi
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Friday, August 29

Genealogical Learning Through Technology
by Patricia Walls Stamm CG, CGL

Can a Complex Problem be Solved Solely Online?
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Trails In, Trails Out: To Texas, From Texas
by David McDonald CG

Researching Your Mexican War Ancestor
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Scots-Irish Workshop
by David E. Rencher AG, CG and Dean J. Hunter AG

BCG Certification Workshop: The Why and the How
by Elissa Scalise Powell CG, CGL, Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL, Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Sources & Citations Simplified: From Memorabilia to Digital Data to DNA
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

After Mustering Out: Researching Civil War Veterans
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

NGS Luncheon: Your Missouri Roots
by Patricia Walls Stamm CG, CGL

NYG&B Luncheon: How Genealogy Hasn’t Changed in Fifty Years
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

That Scoundrel George: Tracking a Black Sheep Texas Ancestor
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Manuscripts and More
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL

Finding Origins & Birth Families: Methods that Work
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

Texas Resource Gems
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Researching the Hessian Soldier
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Have You Really Done the Dawes?
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Home Guards, Confederate Soldiers, and Galvanized Yankees
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Germans to Texas
by David McDonald CG

Saturday, August 30

Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impact on our Research
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Okay I ‘Got the Neighbors’ – Now What Do I Do with Them?
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

eBooks for Genealogists
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL

To Blog or Not to Blog: Sharing Your Research
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Timelines: The Swiss Army Knife of Genealogical Tools
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

DNA Case Studies: Analyzing Test Results
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Davy Crockett: Following the Trail From Limestone to Texas
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Elements Essential for a Polished Family History
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Research Gems: Southern and Western Historical and Sociological Journals
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Beyond X & Y: Using Autosomal DNA for Genealogy
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Genealogical Documentation: The What, Why, Where, and How
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Using Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and XDNA
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Note: Early bird registration closes tomorrow, Tuesday, July 1.


(CG or Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.)

Victor S. Dunn, CG, wins 2014 Mosher Award Competition

 

Vic Dunn, CG

Victor S. Dunn was announced as the 2014 Mosher Award winner at the luncheon of the Board for Certification of Genealogists in Richmond at the National Genealogical Society Conference.

Vic Dunn’s successful entry in the Mosher Award for Colonial Virginia Research competition is a proposal for indexing obscure or difficult unpublished Virginia resources. Dunn is creating a database entitled the Virginia Business Records and Manuscript Index, which will be hosted by the Virginia Genealogical Society at their website (http://www.vgs.org/). The projected launch date is May 2014.

Indexed business records will include merchant journals, ledgers, daybooks, and memorandums, along with account books and documents kept by individual farmers, plantation managers, physicians, and attorneys. A number of these records survive for the colonial period as early as the first half of the eighteenth century, including locations in a number of eastern Virginia burned counties. When possible, the database will include links to online resources.

Vic is a board-certified genealogist and a full-time professional researcher. He coordinates the Virginia track at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Samford University in Alabama and publishes frequently in major genealogical publications, including the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, NGS Magazine, BCG OnBoard, Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, and Virginia Genealogical Society Newsletter. Vic currently serves as a governor of the Virginia Genealogical Society. He is a past trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and past treasurer and board member of the National Genealogical Society.

The annual $500 Mosher Award competition is administered by the BCG Education Fund. For more information about Education Fund programs, visit (http://www.bcgcertification.org/educationfund/index.html).

 

BCG Activities at NGS in Richmond, Virginia, Part II

The festivities and activities continue at the National Genealogical Society conference in the States in Richmond, Virginia. The BCG Skillbuilding sessions that were audio-taped on Thursday, May 8, were: “When the Trail Turns Cold: New Strategies for Old Problems” presented by Diane Florence Gravel, CG; “BCG Certification Seminar: Measuring Yourself Against Standards” (2 sequential sessions) presented by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, and Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL; “Using Evidence Creatively: Spotting Clues in Run-of-the-Mill Records” by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL; “Finding Thomas’s Father” by Pam Stone Eagleson, CG.

The BCG Skillbuilding track has five session on Friday, May 9: “Indexes and Databases” presented by Dawne Slater-Putt, MLS, CG; “Disputes and Unhappy Differences: Surprises in Land Records” by Sharon Tate Moody, CG; “‘Of Sound Mind and Healthy Body’: Using Probate Records in Your Research” by Michael Hait, CG; “The Seanachie: Linking Life and the Law Through Storytelling” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL; “Black Sheep Ancestors and Their Records” by C. Ann Staley, CG, CGL.

Tom Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, will conduct a book signing at the NGS booth Friday from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tom is the author of Mastering Genealogical Proof published 2013 by NGS.

A very special celebration of fifty years of credentialing will be celebrated Friday evening at the NGS banquet. Both BCG’s CG and ICAPGen’s AG credentials are 50 years old, having been instituted in 1964. The speaker, very appropriately credentialed by both organizations, is David Rencher, AG, CG on “Celebrating Genealogy Credentials–The Accreditation and Certification Programs Turn 50!” This is the culmination of a year-long semi-centennial celebration which also included a banquet presentation in October in Salt Lake City presented by Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL and available on the BCG website at http://www.bcgcertification.org/aboutbcg/audio/RussellJ.html.

Saturday’s Skillbuilding lectures finish the week with: “Using and Evaluating Family Lore: She Married  Distant Cousin in Virginia” presented by Jay Fonkert, CG; “Rich, Poor, and All the Rest: Why Class Matters to Genealogists” by Stefani Evans, CG; “Organizing Your Research without Losing Your Mind” by Julie Miller, CG; “Working with Documents: The Importance of Context in Record Analysis” by Barbara Vines Little, CG; “Murder and Mayhem on the River: The Life of the Harpes” by Gail Jackson Miller, CG.

Many of these lectures were audio-taped and will be placed for sale on www.JAMB-INC.com where other conference lectures may be purchased.

BCG Activities at NGS in Richmond, Virginia

On Wednesday, May 7, 2014, the BCG Skillbuilding Track at the National Genealogical Society Conference in the States will have three presentations. At 11 a.m. is “Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search” presented by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. At 2:30 p.m. is “New Standards or Old: Guidelines for Effective Research and Family Histories” by Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL. At 4 p.m. is “Mining the Destination Data” by David E. Rencher, AG, CG.

The BCG booth in the exhibit hall (next to Maia’s Books) has portfolios for the curious to look through as well as a notebook of typical evaluators’ comments. Stop by the booth to look at them there.

Be sure to stop by the booth to pick up a gold card before buying recommended books at Maia’s Bookstore. BCG appreciates the referral as you pick up your copy of the new Genealogy Standards book and others.

On Thursday, look for the Certification Seminar at 9:30 a.m. and continuing through the 11 a.m. lecture session. Come and get your questions answered! The BCG luncheon follows directly afterward and should be a rewarding time together taking a look at BCG’s past 50 years through the eyes of past-presidents Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, Kay Haviland Freilich, CG, CGL, and Laura DeGrazia, CG.

The Skillbuilding track continues each day and is co-sponsored by BCG to help educate attendees on necessary skills. For those who cannot get to the sessions, look for them to be recorded for sale by JAMB-inc.com.

BCG Announces Use of New Standards Book and Aids

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) has announced adoption of its new standards manual for use in its evaluation process.

Effective today, new applications for certification will be evaluated against the new Genealogy Standards, a major revision of genealogical standards released by BCG in February. Individuals who have already submitted a preliminary application are exempt from this change unless they elect otherwise or apply for an extension. The newly revised standards will also be used to evaluate the work of existing BCG associates whose renewal applications are due after February 2015.

Eighty-three standards in the new manual establish criteria for all phases of genealogical work, including documentation, research planning, data collection, reasoning from evidence, writing, lecturing and continuing education. The standards reflect the same principles as those originally published in The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual fourteen years ago but are reorganized, updated, expanded and clarified.

As the standards are at heart unchanged, genealogists whose work meets the old standards should meet the new standards as well. The revision, however, means the new standards offer superior guidance as to the qualities necessary for credible genealogical work.

BCG’s announcement is accompanied by release of a new application guide. The new guide makes no changes to the type of work applicants for certification must submit but has been updated to reflect the new standard manual’s renumbering of most standards. The rubrics, an evaluation tool used by BCG’s judges, have been similarly revised.

To help researchers familiarize themselves with the recent changes, BCG has also released two charts that compare the new and old standards. They can be downloaded from the “Skillbuilding” page of BCG’s website at http://www.bcgcertification.org/skillbuilders/index.html.

The new manual is billed as a fiftieth-anniversary edition to celebrate the board’s fifty years of dedication to genealogical excellence. Genealogy Standards, fiftieth-anniversary edition (Nashville, Tennessee: Ancestry, 2014), may be ordered by visiting http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/index.htmlThe BCG Application Guide, 2014 edition, and the revised rubrics can be downloaded from the BCG website for free.

BCG, an independent credentialing body, was founded in 1964 to promote standards of competence and ethics among genealogists and to publicly recognize individuals who meet those standards. It certifies genealogists in two categories, a core research category, Certified GenealogistSM, and a teaching category, Certified Genealogical LecturerSM. The standards it has articulated are widely recognized as benchmarks for all genealogists who wish to produce accurate research, not just for those seeking certification.

FROM: Board for Certification of Genealogists
P.O. Box 14291
Washington,DC200044

EMAIL: Office@BCGcertification.org
3 March 2014

Fifty Years of Credentialing: Presentations Available

In the “B. C.” era (Before Credentialing) genealogical fraud was rampant. Two organizations sought to give confidence to the public when hiring researchers and coincidentally were founded in the same year of 1964.

Please join BCG and ICAPGen at an unprecedented joint banquet at the NGS conference in Richmond, Virginia, on Friday, May 9, 2014. The evening’s speaker is David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA, whose topic is “Celebrating Genealogical Credentials–The Accreditation and Certification Programs Turn 50!” Both organizations want to thank NGS for their recognition of this milestone in genealogical history. NGS registrations are being taken now at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/. One does not need to be registered for the conference in order to attend the banquet.

BCG began its celebration last year “in the 50th year of its age” with a luncheon talk at FGS in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, by Rev. David McDonald, CG on “No Diamonds, No Cherries: Celebrating a Jubilee” which can be heard on the BCG website.

At a joint banquet in Salt Lake City in October, the American Society of Genealogists and BCG sponsored Judy Russell, J.D., CG, CGL, as the banquet speaker. Her full presentation “We’ve Come a Long Way, Baby!” can be viewed on the BCG website. Judy’s presentation is also an article in the NGS Magazine (January–March 2014, volume 40, number 1): 15-19.

When we think of the days of undocumented genealogies being fabricated on purpose or unintentionally, there was no recourse for the public or standards by which to determine the reliability of a pedigree. Now we have credentialing and a newly-edited Genealogy Standards book which helps consumers understand the parameters of good genealogy. We have, indeed, “Come a Long Way, Baby!”

New Board-Certified Genealogist: Darcie M. Hind Posz, Washington, D.C.

Darcie M. Hind Posz

Darcie M. Hind Posz of Washington, D.C. has earned the credential of Certified GenealogistSM.

The newest member of the Class of 2013, Darcie has been a professional genealogist for more than nine years. She is President of the National Capital Area Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists and will be Region 4, Northeast, Board Director for the Association of Professional Genealogists in 2014.

Her research emphases include Chicago and Hawaiian/Polynesian genealogy and urban ancestors. Her writing has appeared in the APG Quarterly, FGS FORUM and NGS Magazine and portions of her research are housed at Columbia University. She is the NGSQ Study Group Coordinator and in the past served as the chair of the Federation of Genealogical Societies Outreach Committee.

She resides in Washington, D.C., and can be reached at darcieposz@hotmail.com.

Darcie’s achievement came on her second attempt at certification and she credits both perseverance and continuing education for her success. Asked if she had advice for those seeking certification, Darcie suggested “elaborate outlines to make sure that all of the criteria stated in the instructions, rubrics and the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) will be met.”

Her genealogical heroes include Elizabeth Shown Mills (“her methodology and studies on multicultural subjects have inspired me for years”), Thomas W. Jones (his new book Mastering Genealogical Proof and teaching style “made understanding and applying the GPS attainable”), and Eugene A. Stratton and Neil D. Thompson (“my lineage heroes”; “Stratton’s comment about DNA in Psychic Roots is what inspires me to do what I do,” while Thompson’s work “feeds the royal lineage junkie within me”).

She hopes, when seeking recertification in five years, to be in the Waipio Valley beginning her dream of a land study done on foot.

Let’s all extend a warm welcome to Darcie!

Genealogy Standards Updated in New Manual

In honor of its fiftieth anniversary, the Board for Certification of Genealogists® (“BCG”) has issued Genealogy Standards, a manual for best practices in research and assembly of accurate family histories. This revision completely updates and reorganizes the original 2000 edition of The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual.

 “Accuracy is fundamental to genealogical research,” writes editor Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, in the introduction. “Without it, a family’s history would be fiction. This manual presents the standards family historians use to obtain valid results. These standards apply to all genealogical research, whether shared privately or published.”

The 83 specific standards cover the process of researching family history and the finished products of the research. Based on the five-part Genealogical Proof Standard, the standards cover:

  • documenting (standards 1–8);
  • researching (standards 9–50), including planning, collecting, and reasoning from evidence;
  • writing (standards 51–73), including proofs, assembly, and special products;
  • teaching and lecturing (standards 74–81); and
  • continuing education (standards 82 & 83).

The 100-page book includes appendices: the genealogist’s code, a description of BCG and its work, a list of sources and resources where examples of work that meets standards are regularly published, a glossary, and an evidence-process map distinguishing the three kinds of sources, information, and evidence.

 “We are delighted to provide this new edition, which is meant for all genealogical researchers and practitioners as a way to recognize sound genealogy,” said BCG president Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. “We appreciate the many hands that helped bring this new edition to fruition and look forward to its widespread usage in the field.”

SAVE 20%! To place a specially-priced, pre-publication order with delivery in the first part of February 2014, visit http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/index.html. Regularly priced at $14.95, the pre-publication price is $11.95 before January 27, 2014.

Citation: Board for Certification of Genealogists. Genealogy Standards, 50th-anniversary edition. Nashville, Tenn.: Ancestry, 2014. 100 pp., paper, ISBN 978-1-63026-018-7, $14.95.