BCG at FGS

The Board for Certification of Genealogists will be Gone to Texas August 27-30 for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference in San Antonio, Texas.

BCG will have a booth in the vendor hall where information about certification and standards will be available, and where those considering certification can review portfolios.

And Board-certified genealogists will take to the podium in large numbers. Scheduled presentations by associates include:

Wednesday, August 27

Strong Business Strategy = Sound Society Strategy
by David E. Rencher AG, CG, and Ed Donakey

The Dotted Line: Sign Before Other Steps
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Calling All Society Webmasters: Past, Present, and Future
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Volunteering from a Distance
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Thursday, August 28

Making Sense of It All: Critical Thinking for Genealogists
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

Finding Hidden Manuscripts Throughout the Trans-Mississippi South
by J. Mark Lowe CG

BCG Luncheon: Genealogy Standards: Fine Wine in a New Bottle
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Workshop: Maps! Wonderful Maps!
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL, Richard G (Rick) Sayre CG, CGL

Poor? Black? Female? Southern Research Strategies (2-hour session)
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

Workshop: German Gothic Handwriting-Anyone Can Read It!
by F. Warren Bittner CG

Finding Freedmen Marriage Records
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Inferential Genealogy
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

A Family for Isabella: Indirect Evidence from Texas back to Mississippi
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Friday, August 29

Genealogical Learning Through Technology
by Patricia Walls Stamm CG, CGL

Can a Complex Problem be Solved Solely Online?
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Trails In, Trails Out: To Texas, From Texas
by David McDonald CG

Researching Your Mexican War Ancestor
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Scots-Irish Workshop
by David E. Rencher AG, CG and Dean J. Hunter AG

BCG Certification Workshop: The Why and the How
by Elissa Scalise Powell CG, CGL, Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL, Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Sources & Citations Simplified: From Memorabilia to Digital Data to DNA
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

After Mustering Out: Researching Civil War Veterans
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

NGS Luncheon: Your Missouri Roots
by Patricia Walls Stamm CG, CGL

NYG&B Luncheon: How Genealogy Hasn’t Changed in Fifty Years
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

That Scoundrel George: Tracking a Black Sheep Texas Ancestor
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Manuscripts and More
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL

Finding Origins & Birth Families: Methods that Work
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

Texas Resource Gems
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Researching the Hessian Soldier
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Have You Really Done the Dawes?
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Home Guards, Confederate Soldiers, and Galvanized Yankees
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Germans to Texas
by David McDonald CG

Saturday, August 30

Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impact on our Research
by Craig Roberts Scott CG

Okay I ‘Got the Neighbors’ – Now What Do I Do with Them?
by Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL

eBooks for Genealogists
by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL

To Blog or Not to Blog: Sharing Your Research
by Linda Woodward Geiger CG, CGL

Timelines: The Swiss Army Knife of Genealogical Tools
by Amy Johnson Crow CG

DNA Case Studies: Analyzing Test Results
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Davy Crockett: Following the Trail From Limestone to Texas
by J. Mark Lowe CG

Elements Essential for a Polished Family History
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Research Gems: Southern and Western Historical and Sociological Journals
by Paula Stuart-Warren CG

Beyond X & Y: Using Autosomal DNA for Genealogy
by Judy G. Russell JD, CG, CGL

Genealogical Documentation: The What, Why, Where, and How
by Thomas W. Jones PhD, CG, CGL

Using Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and XDNA
by Debbie Parker Wayne CG, CGL

Note: Early bird registration closes tomorrow, Tuesday, July 1.


(CG or Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.)

ACTION: Mutual Support for Those Assembling Application Portfolios

Image courtesy of Microsoft Office

BCG established a mutual support network for applicants, called ACTION. Here is how our Certification FAQ describes this list:

BCG invites preliminary applicants to subscribe to an email mentoring group called ACTION (Aids to Certification Testing: Interactive Online Networking). This list does not provide educational preparation; it will not teach applicants about sources, citations, analysis, or any other aspect of research. It does, however, provide a supportive forum where applicants can meet other applicants, and BCG trustees and members of BCG’s Outreach Committee are available to answer questions about the certification process and requirements.

What is it like? Don’t forget that all current Board-certified genealogists have already gone through the process of assembling a portfolio and can relate to the emotional and intellectual issues involved. Several have volunteered to participate in ACTION.

In an ACTION conversation on May 15th of this year.  BCG President Elissa Scalise Powell wrote at 8:04 pm, “So how does … our sense of perfection affect our portfolio process? Does it affect the work sample selections? Does it affect the inability to submit until we find that one last perfect record or case?”

Then at 8:36 pm, Patti Hobbs came back with a story to which we all can relate.

I, too, since I started the clock, am just trying to finish up stuff I’ve been working on for many years. I returned to a courthouse I’d visited about 8 years ago because I hadn’t developed my system for photographing book covers that I now have implemented, and I didn’t have exact titles to use for citations. I also made a trip to Wisconsin just to look for a tombstone that was not on Find-A-Grave and no cemetery book exists outside of the town where the cemetery is located. And the library will not do look-ups because of staffing problems. But without it, I had no proof of one person’s death. Thank goodness she actually had a tombstone!

My first issue was deciding which family to use for my KDP. I worked on two, and then decided not to use either. All totally different. One was a Pennsylvania family, one was a Virginia to Indiana to Iowa family, and the one I settled on is a New England to New York to the Midwest and to-many-parts west.

Then since I had not done “client” work, I did several projects, two of which were very time-consuming, for other people to find a good client case to use. (I do not lack for people to help with their genealogy since I work in a library.)  I rejected using cases I had not solved even though I know that’s permissible.  And even now I don’t think the one I’ve chosen is necessarily the best I could do because I’d prefer to do something more challenging. But as it is no one “out there” had the answer, and I found the answer. Although by the time I submit my portfolio relatives of the now-deceased “client” (pro-bono) may get it out there.

Then I spent a very long time tracking collaterals for the KDP, and probably doing much more than is necessary for the portfolio. But in that process, I found that I really enjoyed doing that. I felt that what I learned from fleshing out all the collaterals, who did not move en masse to the same areas, was very interesting for learning about migration. So I have more biographical detail on the collaterals than is needed. I also did an extra generation because there’s a facet that is in the first generation I wanted included, and there’s a facet to the fourth generation I wanted included. I also wanted the KDP to be enjoyable and informative for other family and not necessarily just those in my direct line.

For me, I had too many other things in my life that were more important in the grand scheme of things than submitting my portfolio for me to make it a priority. That has now changed. And a big motivator for me is I really want to get to work on some other families that are just dangling around waiting to be written up.

Thank you, Patti, for sharing your process for choosing portfolio elements.

To all our readers, once you are on-the-clock, you can participate in ACTION. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Introducing: Sharon Hoyt, CG

Sharon Hoyt, who received her Certified Genealogist credential earlier this year, is a genealogy researcher and lecturer from California’s Silicon Valley.

Sharon Hoyt, CG

She became interested in genealogy after her husband’s research on his Mayflower ancestors made her curious about her own family origins. What began as a hobby quickly became a passion, and in 2002, she traded a career as an information architect managing intranet content and search tools for large technology companies to focus on genealogy research.

As a native Californian whose family has lived in the state since the 1880s, she enjoys helping clients trace their ancestors’ paths to the Golden State. Her areas of interest include New England, New York, and the Midwest, with a particular focus on Civil War research. In addition to her client research, she serves as a consultant to Ancestry.com. She is a member of APG, NGS, NEHGS, and the Southern California Genealogical Society.

Sharon’s key advice to those thinking about certification is this: “Don’t be afraid to apply – the application process is a great learning experience!”

She notes that her own preparation was broad-based, but in addition to seminars, webinars, conferences and institutes (NIGR and SLIG), she found the graded NGS American Genealogy Home Study Course particularly helpful in preparing her application. “The experience of working through lessons on my own and receiving written feedback was very similar to the BCG certification process.”

Sharon credits her cousin, Pauline Love, who was 92 years young when they met, as her genealogy muse: “The stories she shared made our ancestors’ lives real to me, and her endless curiosity and excitement about family history encouraged me to seek out new sources to answer her many questions. She inspired me to dig deeper to find the stories behind the basic facts.”

Her genealogical heroes? “The thousands of people who volunteer their time to collect, preserve, index, and share records to help others find their families. I’ve learned so much from volunteers in local genealogical and historical societies, and appreciate their willingness to share their time and expertise.”

And, she adds, “I’m grateful to my husband for introducing me to a dream career, and for his patience and willingness to visit archives, libraries, and cemeteries on every vacation trip.”


(CG or Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Board-certified genealogists after periodic competency evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.)